Marginal thinking: Beinecke MS 411

The canon
Beinecke MS 411, Canon
The Carthusian
Beinecke MS 411, Carthusian

This dance consists of 15 persons with one person in the margin of each page.

There is no text at all, which can make it quite challenging to identify the dancers. It helps that the manuscript reminds a lot of Lewis E 113. For instance, the ecclesiastical to the left looks precisely like the canon in Lewis E 113, where the text informs us that the man is a canon of the Rule of St. Augustine. In the same manner the ecclesiastical to the right is the twin of the pitiful Carthusian in Lewis E 113.

The nobleman?"
Beinecke MS 411, Nobleman
The young man?"
Beinecke MS 411, Young man

The problem is that the texts in Lewis E 133 are not always unambiguous, legible or informative.

Take the two men to the left and right side: They are more or less identical, wearing a blue jersey, red coat, fur collar and flat hat, but the problem is that Lewis E 133 has three such participants: a count, an unidentified gentleman and (probably) a nobleman. In this case, we can at most come up with qualified guesses.

The next book was once owned by Francis Douce.

Go forth
 

The next subject in this series is a book of hours once owned by Francis Douce

The previous subject was Lewis E 113.

External links

Pope
Beinecke MS 411 : Pope
Emperor
Beinecke MS 411 1500: Emperor
Cardinal
Beinecke MS 411 1500: Cardinal
King
Beinecke MS 411 1500: King
Bishop
Beinecke MS 411 1500: Bishop
Nobleman
Beinecke MS 411 1500: Nobleman
Abbot
Beinecke MS 411 1500: Abbot
Connétable
Beinecke MS 411 1500: Connétable
Canon
Beinecke MS 411 1500: Canon
Young man
Beinecke MS 411 1500: Young man
Carthusian
Beinecke MS 411 1500: Carthusian
Merchant
Beinecke MS 411 1500: Merchant
Franciscan
Beinecke MS 411 1500: Franciscan
Peasant
Beinecke MS 411 1500: Peasant
Hermit
Beinecke MS 411 1500: Hermit